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Greater Minds: Stephen King’s opening sentences

The first sentence turns a potential reader into a concentrating reader. Stephen King’s first sentences hook the reader with tension and introduce his voice. If the first sentence doesn’t do its job, later sentences won’t be read. King says, ‘to

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Posted in Greater minds, Wednesday Pontification

Introducing Characters with George and Lennie

Characters must be introduced with very few details. In Of Mice and Men, of George and Lennie’s introduction tells us what is important without a word of description. Putting contrasting characters together brings out the salient points of their personalities.

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Posted in Wednesday Pontification, Writing

The first sentence

Let’s consider one of the most famous first sentences in English literature: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch

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Posted in Story development, Writing

The first 100 words

I’ve mentioned the importance of the story opening often enough that you’re probably beginning to wonder why I left it until now to describe. The reason is that the clearer an idea you have of what the rest of the

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Posted in Story development, Writing
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